Tulare Wellness Center    
 Accident & Injury Center
Quality Care Since 1994

Massage Services



Professional massage by qualified therapists in a friendly atmosphere.
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How Much Does it Cost?
Massages are generally $30 for 1/2 hour, or $50 for 1 hour. Discounts are often available, and we have a special program called the "Rub Club", which allows for much greater discounts for those who want regular massage. In our clinic, you also get a greater value than many places, because Dr. Mitchell will perform an initial screening including blood pressure and other vital measurements to make sure it is safe to receive treatment. All this is included at no extra charge.

Are The Massage Therapists Qualified?
All of our massage therapists (CMTs) are certified, and graduated from a certified Massage Therapy School.

Do I need Chiropractic or Massage?
That determination is up to the doctor, and the patient's preference. Once you have been evaluated, the doctor can make a recommendation for either type of treatment or a combination of the two. We have found that the combination is very powerful.

What is Massage?

Massage is one of the oldest healing arts: Chinese records dating back 3,000 years document its use; the ancient Hindus, Persians and Egyptians applied forms of massage for many ailments; and Hippocrates wrote papers recommending the use of rubbing and friction for joint and circulatory problems. Today, the benefits of massage are varied and far-reaching. As an accepted part of many physical rehabilitation programs, massage therapy has also proven beneficial for many chronic conditions, including low back pain, arthritis, bursitis, fatigue, high blood pressure, diabetes, immunity suppression, infertility, smoking cessation, depression, and more. And, as many millions will attest, massage also helps relieve the stress and tension of everyday living that can lead to disease and illness.

So What Is It Exactly?
Massage, bodywork and somatic therapies are defined as the application of various techniques to the muscular structure and soft tissues of the human body. Specifically:

Massage: The application of soft-tissue manipulation techniques to the body, generally intended to reduce stress and fatigue while improving circulation. The many variations of massage account for several different techniques.

Bodywork: Various forms of touch therapies that may use manipulation, movement, and/or repatterning to affect structural changes to the body.

Somatic: Meaning “of the body.” Many times this term is used to denote a body/mind or whole-body approach as distinguished from a physiology-only or environmental perspective.

There are more than 200 variations of massage, bodywork, and somatic therapies and many practitioners utilize multiple techniques. The application of these techniques may include, but is not limited to, stroking, kneading, tapping, compression, vibration, rocking, friction, and pressure to the muscular structure or soft tissues of the human body. This may also include non-forceful passive or active movement and/or application of techniques intended to affect the energetic systems of the body. The use of oils, lotions, and powders may also be included to reduce friction on the skin.

 Will My Insurance Cover It?
The services of a bodywork professional may be covered by health insurance when prescribed by a chiropractor, medical doctor, or osteopath. Therapies provided as part of a prescribed treatment by a physician or registered physical therapist are often covered. It all depends upon your particular insurance coverage. Call our office with your information, and we can check your insurance coverage for you.

The Benefits of Massage: Is Bodywork Right For Me?
Massage provides relief to people of all ages—from infants to seniors—and from all walks of life—the weekend or competitive athlete to the home gardener or overstressed, overworked executive.

Treating the Body
Massage therapy addresses a variety of health conditions, the most prevalent being stress-related tension, which, experts believe, accounts for 80%-90% of disease. Massage has been proven beneficial in treating back pain, neck pain, cancer-related fatigue, sleep disorders, high blood pressure, diabetes, immunity suppression, spinal cord injury, autism, post-operative surgery, age-related disorders, infertility, eating disorders, smoking cessation, and depression, to name just a few. Here’s why:

Bodywork offers a drug-free, non-invasive and humanistic approach based on the body’s natural ability to heal itself. Massage has many physiological effects, such as:

  • Increasing circulation, allowing the body to pump more oxygen and nutrients into tissues and vital organs.
  • Stimulating the lymph system, the body’s natural defense, against toxic invaders. For example, in breast cancer patients, massage has been shown to increase the cells that fight cancer.
  • Relaxing and softening injured and overused muscles.
  • Reducing spasms and cramping.
  • Increasing joint flexibility.
  • Reducing recovery time for strenuous workouts and eliminating subsequent pains of the athlete at any level.
  • Releasing endorphins, the body’s natural painkiller. For this reason, massage is being incorporated into treatment for chronic illness, injury and recovery from surgery to control and relieve pain.
  • Reducing post-surgery adhesions and edema and reducing and realigning scar tissue after healing has occurred.
  • Improving range of motion and decreasing discomfort for patients with low back pain.
  • Relieving pain for migraine sufferers and decreasing the need for medication.
  • Providing exercise and stretching for atrophied muscles and reducing shortening of the muscles for those with restricted range of motion.
  • Contributing to shorter labor and reduced tearing for expectant mothers, as well as lessening the need for medication, minimizing depression and anxiety, and shortening hospital stays.

It’s important to note that there are some conditions where massage is not recommended. For example, massage is contraindicated in people with:

  • Certain forms of cancer
  • Phlebitis
  • Some cardiac problems
  • Some skin conditions
  • Infectious diseases

Your practitioner should ask you about your specific health conditions and determine if massage, bodywork or somatic therapies are a good idea. We are fortunate that Dr. Mitchell can work so closely with the masage therapists.